The Difference between Art and Craft

The two terms, ‘art’ and ‘craft,’ are commonly used interchangeably to describe children’s activities. This creates confusion about the true nature of the genres; each is defined by differing characteristics:

Art is a creative activity produced by human imagination and expression, typically through visual and written forms: drawing, painting, sculpture, literature, music, dance. The works are created and inspired primarily for their beauty and their emotional power.

Craft is an activity involving skill and technique in making or duplicating something by hand: woodwork, pottery, textiles, knitting, jewelry. Their primary use is both practical and purposeful in daily living and education

 

Art is a Natural Form of Expression for Children.

The essence of art is expressing oneself. To develop a sense of self- expression, children need the opportunity to make their own decisions about their artwork.

When adult feedback or approval is removed, a child is more likely to take risks and make mistakes. This fosters creativity, exploration and exciting outcomes.

Process-oriented art education uses the simplest materials, few clear directions, and open-ended time to experience the creative process.
The door then opens to little masterpieces: self-portraits, representational drawing, abstract design and so on.

Continue reading


Montessori Teaches Self-supporting Practices that help develop Independence

montessori-independenceIn the Montessori classroom children practice how to be self-sufficient, self-supporting and self-reliant.

The specialized learning environment promotes the physical, emotional and cognitive development children need to become independent. The tables and chairs are child-sized; the shelves are low and easy to reach; the materials are colour-coded and built for small hands. Continue reading


Foster independence in your child by Four Seasons Montessori Preschool

four-seasons-montessori-fostering-independenceIt is sometimes difficult to allow your child to make the mistakes it takes to master a task at hand. All too often it is more work to clean up after your child has “helped” rather than just doing the task yourself. However, it is important to do your best to let your child try and complete any activity they are engaged in. Children have the will; it’s just the skill that’s needs improvement.  By disrupting your child’s work you may inadvertently give them the signal that they are not good enough. Positive self esteem and independent thought are nurtured by positive experiences to actions in the child’s world.   Continue reading